As part opf the “Dr. Oz 28 Days to Reduce the Risk of Heart Attack Challenge,” I’ve been looking for ways to add Flax Seeds to the family recipes. Dr. Oz’s first step is to add 2 tablespoons of Flax Seeds or Flax Seed Oil to your daily diet. In college, my friend Cathy always made a yummy carrot salad with shredded carrots, raisins and globs of fresh sour cream. It was my favorite. This is a re-vamped healthier version of that food memory using Greek Yogurt!

Carrot, Raisin, Date, Walnut, Flax Seed and Greek Yogurt Salad

Rating: 5

Total Time: 10 minutes

Yield: 3 cups

Serving Size: 1 cup

Calories per serving: 276

Fat per serving: 117 fat calories, total fat 13g, sat fat 1.3g, tra

Good points: very low cholesterol, low in sodium, high in dietary fiber, high in mangnese, very high in vitamin A
Bad Points: very high in sugar
Nutrition Facts: 276 calories, 117 calories from fat, total fat 13g, saturated fat 1.3g, trans fat 0g, cholesterol 2mg, sodium 66mg, total carbohydrates 36.3g, dietary fiber 7.3g, sugars 24g, protein 9.3, vitamin A 245%, calcium 10%, vitamin C 8%, iron 9%

Ingredients

  • 1 -10 ounce bag of matchstick carrots, (I don’t shred my own!!)
  • 1/3 cup of dark raisins, (Light Raisins are bleached)
  • 1/4 cup of chopped dates
  • 1/3 cup of walnuts
  • 3 tbsps. of flax seeds
  • Dash of cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt (add more if you like it creamier)

Instructions

  1. Mix all of the dry ingredients first in a bowl, then add the Greek yogurt and mix again with a large spoon.
  2. Chill for several hours.
  3. This salad tastes best the next day after the flavors have a chance to blend.
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http://chubbychickshealthclub.com/recipes/salad-dressing-salad-recipes/carrot-raisin-date-walnut-flax-seed-and-greek-yogurt-salad/

What’s it Good For?
Carrots
Carrot offers an excellent source of beta-carotene. In our body, beta-carotene is converted into Vitamin A, which assists in improving our eyesight and the functioning of our immune system, strengthening our bones and teeth, along with preventing possible problems with the functioning of the thyroid gland. Vitamin A also has positive effects on our hair, nails and skin.
Vitamin A is associated with good cleansing effects: it can clean our liver from fat and other unnecessary elements.
Vitamin A is essential for healthy cell growth, strong immune system and protection against macular degeneration and aging.
Carrots also contain vitamin B, C, D, E and K, protein, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, aluminum, sodium, manganese, iron, copper and a lot of other minerals.
Carrots contain great amounts of nicotine acid, which is important for metabolism of fats and lipids. The vegetable is a great source of natural magnesium, which assists in decreasing bad cholesterol levels in the body, helps to relieve spasms and strengthen our blood vessels.

Carrots are good for the health of spleen and stomach. It is also believed to improve impotence, sexual dysfunction, night blindness, strengthening kidney and eliminating excessive wind and cold in our body.
Carrots are rich in alkaline elements, which purify and revitalize the blood. They balance the acid alkaline ratio in the body.

Potassium in carrots helps to balance the high levels of sodium associated with hypertension, and keeps blood pressure under control.

The high soluble fiber content reduces cholesterol by binding LDL, the bad cholesterol. Moreover, carrots increase HDL, the good

Cinnamon
Besides using it in cooking, cinnamon is also thought to have health benefits.
In traditional Chinese medicine, Cassia cinnamon is used for colds, flatulence, nausea, diarrhea, and painful menstrual periods. It’s also believed to improve energy, vitality, and circulation and be particularly useful for people who tend to feel hot in their upper body but have cold feet.
There has been some preliminary research on the effect of cinnamon on blood sugar in humans, but the studies have been small and the findings need to be confirmed with larger trials.
One of the first human studies was published in 2003 in the journal Diabetes Care. Sixty people with type 2 diabetes took 1, 3, or 6 grams of cinnamon in pill form daily — an amount roughly equivalent to one quarter of a teaspoon to one teaspoon of cinnamon.
After 40 days, all 3 amounts of cinnamon reduced fasting blood glucose by 18 to 29%, triglycerides by 23 to 30%, LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) by 7 to 27%, and total

Dates
Dates are a great source of dietary fiber.
Dates are one of the best natural sources of potassium. Potassium is an essential mineral your body needs to maintain muscle contractions including the vital heart muscle. Potassium is needed to maintain a healthy nervous system and to balance the body’s metabolism as well.
Dates also contain a variety of B-complex vitamins – thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6 and pantothenic acid. These vitamins have a variety of functions that help maintain a healthy body – to metabolize carbohydrates and maintain blood glucose levels, fatty acids for energy, and they help make hemoglobin, the red and white blood cells. Dates also contain Magnesium which is essential for healthy bone development and for energy metabolism and Iron which is essential to red blood cell production. Red blood cells carry all the nutrients to cells throughout the body. In addition, Dates are fat and cholesterol free!

Flaxseeds
High content of alpha linoleic acids (ALA) has made the ancient flax seed become our modern miracle food. ALA is a type of plant-derived omega 3 fatty acid, slightly different from the marine-based omega 3. Early studies found that flax seeds may aid lowering total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (the Bad cholesterol) levels. They may also keep platelets from becoming sticky therefore reducing the risk of a heart attack.
Rich in lignin, a type phytoestrogen (antioxidant) and also provides fiber. Researches revealed that lignan in flax seed shows a lot of promise in fighting disease — including a possible role in cancer prevention especially breast cancer. It is thought that lignan metabolites can bind to estrogen receptors, hence inhibiting the onset of estrogen-stimulated breast cancer.
Recent studies also showed positive benefits of flax seed oil in Crohn’s Disease and Colitis. Flax seed oil seems to be able to heal the inner lining of the inflamed intestines.

Greek Yogurt
Greek yogurt can have twice as much protein as regular yogurt.
Greek yogurt has less sodium by up to 50 percent. Plus, it still has a full-bodied taste without the high sodium content.
If you are watching your carbohydrate intake or have sensitivity to carbohydrates like diabetes, then Greek yogurt is your ticket. Regular yogurts have 15 to 17 grams of carbohydrates per cup, where Greek yogurt averages around 9 grams.
Because Greek yogurt contains fewer carbohydrates than regular yogurt, it has less lactose, the sugar in dairy products that can sometimes upset people’s stomachs. This is especially helpful for people who have lactose intolerance.
Greek yogurt can be used for many dishes including savory and sweet. Due to its thick texture and rich taste, many people use it as a substitute for milk, sour cream and even use it for baking.

Raisins
The health benefits of raisins include relief from constipation, acidosis, anaemia, fever, and sexual weakness. Raisins also help in weight gain, eye care, dental care, and bone health. Catechin, a phenolic anti-oxidant present in raisins, is very effective for prevention of tumor and cancer of colon. The fibers in it help excretion of bile from the body, burning of cholesterol and thereby ensuring good cardiac health.

Walnuts
Walnuts are one of the best plant sources of protein. They are rich in fiber, B vitamins, magnesium, and antioxidants such as Vitamin E. Nuts in general are also high in plant sterols and fat – but mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (omega 3 fatty acids, in particular, alpha-linoleic acid ALA) that have been shown to lower LDL cholesterol. Walnuts, indeed, have significantly higher amounts of ALA omega 3 fatty acids compared to other nuts.
More than a decade of scientific evidence shows that incorporating walnuts in a healthy diet reduces the risk of heart disease by improving blood vessel elasticity and plaque accumulation. Walnuts have also been shown to aid in the lowering LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol) and the C – reactive protein (CRP). CRP was recently recognized as an independent marker and predictor of heart disease.

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